Sophia University

Academics Graduate School of Global Studies (Program in English is available)

Global Studies Courses

Foundational Courses

AG741 Introduction to Global Studies 1

Professor: Co) WATANABE Takehiro
The course is required for all Global Studies (AG) MA students in the Graduate Program in Global Studies and is not available to other students. In addition, all Global Studies (AG) Ph.D. students who have not yet taken it must complete this course (the completion of which exempts the student from one qualifying exam). It provides a broad and interdisciplinary view of foundational ideas and problems in global studies. Four faculty members teach the course each semester. In addition to this course, all Global Studies MA students must take Introduction to Global Studies II in either the prior or subsequent semester. The markers “I” and “II” only indicate the semester in which the courses are taught. Students should take whichever course is offered that semester, regardless of number.

AG745 Introduction to Global Studies 2

Professor: Co) WATANABE Takehiro
This course is an introduction to global studies. The course is required for all Global Studies (AG) MA students in the Graduate Program in Global Studies and is not available to other students. In addition, all Global Studies (AG) Ph.D. students who have not yet taken it must complete this course (the completion of which exempts the student from one qualifying exam). It provides a broad and interdisciplinary view of foundational ideas and problems in global studies. Four faculty members teach the course each semester. In addition to this course, all Global Studies MA students must take Introduction to Global Studies II in either the prior or subsequent semester. The markers “I” and “II” only indicate the semester in which the courses are taught. Students should take whichever course is offered that semester, regardless of number.

Elective Courses

AG502 Comparative Politics

Professor: NAKANO Koichi
This course introduces students to a range of “classic” works in comparative politics. A variety of themes that have been central to comparative political research shall be covered.

AG504 Democracy in Globalization

Professor: NAKANO Koichi
This course explores a variety of issues that advanced industrial democracies face today in the context of globalization. In particular, we shall focus on what may be called “the politics of reform” and seek through concrete case studies to analyze the political dynamics that account for the prominence of the symbol of “reform” in contemporary politics.

AG508 Empire and Aftermath - A Global History

Professor: HESS Christian
This seminar explores major thematic and topical issues that make up "global history". This year we will focus on empires/colonies and their aftermath as a conceptual and narrative lens through which to create and/or critique global history. Can we meaningfully compare empires across time and space? How do we understand decolonization and the end of empire in historical terms? The course will be loosely chronological and we will explore the major empires of the modern world, including French, British, American, Russian, and Japanese cases.. In addition, we will pursue a number of thematic issues related to imperialism and colonialism that can be interdisciplinary and comparative in nature.

AG509 China-The Global History of A Rising Power

Professor: HESS Christian
China’s rise as a global economic and military power continues to be one of the most important stories of the modern world. This course contextualizes China’s global aspirations through an examination of its history. China had long been one of the largest agrarian empires on earth, with regional and even global reach in various historical periods. Today, China has deployed this history in support of both a nationalistic domestic agenda, but also globally, as an effort to brand modern China as a kind of benevolent rising superpower. Topics we will cover will include China’s historical economic development, ‘The Great Divergence”, the history of regional interactions and building of a multi-ethnic empire, ethnic tension, exchanges (material, cultural, intellectual), interactions with Japan, pan-Asianism, imperialism and anti-imperialist nationalism, the Chinese diaspora, China’s role in the socialist world, China in Africa, Chinese cities as sites of globalization (or not), and the ongoing environmental, social and cultural consequences of state-capitalist expansion.

AG510 Globalization and Popular Religion

Professor: MURAKAMI Tatsuo
The overall objective of this course is to reexamine our perception of “religion” by placing it in a theoretical framework called “globalization.” The first half of the course addresses different roles religion plays in the globalized world as it promotes, enhances or resists the globalization process. In the second half, we will focus on the recent global spread of Pentecostalism in particular and examine how this popular religious movement is gaining its momentum because of/in spite of globalization.

AG5 Theories and Issues in Global Studies

Professor: WANK David
In this course we have two focus. 1. We examine how Buddhism has been transformed in the modern era through waves of colonialism, modernity, and globalization. Equal attention is paid to, on the one hand, changes in doctrines and practices, through these processes, and, on the other the actors, artifacts, and mobilities that have constituted the changes, as well as the spread of Buddhism. 2. We consider issues of global culture. We examine the transnational interactions, localization of ideas, and power and authority by which a culture become globalized. What aspects of a culture are more likely to become localized and what aspects less so.

Additionally, the course will help you hone skills for the critical reading of social science texts through weekly critical evaluation assignments that form the basis of class discussions. The course assumes that students have no prior knowledge of Buddhism.

AG516 Global Migration

Professor: SUNAM Ramesh
This is an introductory course to migration studies. The course reviews key theories and research on migration, its causes, consequences, and policy implications. The first part of this course provides contemporary patterns of migration around the world. To introduce students to key frameworks through which to understand migration, the course then focuses on key concepts and migration theories, including global and national policy frameworks governing Asian migrations. The second part of the course primarily focuses on Asia, particularly on Japan, and covers thematic issues in Asian migrations such as migration and sustainable development, gendered migration patterns, and climate change and migration. Readings for this course will come mainly from the disciplines of sociology, anthropology and human geography and will often draw from qualitative studies.

This course uses mainly two online tools: Moodle and Zoom. On the Moodle page of this course, students can find the details of the syllabus including key readings and assignments.

AG518 Global Health

Professor: SUGAWARA Yuka
This course will be conducted online using Moodle (main platform) and Zoom.
The three main goals of this course are to: 1) introduce major theories of social demography, 2) further the understanding of mechanisms underlying health inequalities around the world, and 3) enhance students’ research skills by developing an empirical research paper during the course of the semester.

AG522 Quantitative Research Methods

Professor: SUGAWARA Yuka
This course provides students with a basic background in quantitative research methods in social sciences. Course requirements include discussions, group/individual work, and presentations.

AG524 Human Rights

Professor: FAHY Sandra
*******Not offered in 2020*******

This course begins with an introduction to basic practice and theory of human rights. Following this, we focus deeper into key topics related to health, violence and structural violence as they relate to human rights. All reading materials are provided on Moodle. It is your responsibility to read through these, locate the proper reading for the proper day, and come prepared to class. Attendance at EACH CLASS is required and missing a class could result in failing the course (you must have a solid reason for missing class). Attendance at ALL classes (including the first week) is thus a REQUIREMENT TO PASS THIS COURSE.

AG528 Qualitative Research Methods

Professor: FARRER James
This course is a practical introduction to qualitative research methods used by sociologists and other professionals. The focus will be on interviewing and analysis of interview data. Because this course is taught online the method will be online interviewing.

The course will conducted with a mix of uploaded lectures on moodle, offline work also uploaded to moodle, and interactive discussions via Zoom. Every meeting there will be either an assignment with feedback through comments from the professor or face-to-face through Zoom. Students will also be required to comment upon and advise other members on their research projects. For commenting upon each other's work, google docs is advised, but other methods are possible.

AG530 Global Cities

Professor: FARRER James
This course will be an introduction to urban sociology focusing on the ethnography of global cities. The first part of the course will be a general introduction to the idea of the global city. The subsequent sections will focus on specific topics in the study of global cities: migration, urban foodways, and urban sexual scenes.

AG531 Global Politics

Professor: ITO Takeshi
This course is concerned with the theory and practice of international development. We will study the evolution of the project of development from its launched as a post-World War II initiative to its characteristics under the current era of economic globalization and liberalization, including backlashes against the forms this project has taken. Each phase of development has been marked by intense theoretical and practical debate, from the certainties of modernization theory, the explanatory perspectives of dependency theory to more current critiques of anti-development and anti-globalization theorists. In this course, we will examine the intellectual and practical foundations of these debates. To do so, we will link development theories to the material practice of development.

AG532 Media and Politics

Professor: BURRETT Tina
The news media are enormously powerful and have a strong role in all aspects of governance. Should journalists, who are not elected by the people, have this much power, and can they exercise it effectively? Or are news organisations inevitably compromised by their drive for profit? What is the impact of the tumultuous change sweeping the news media? Will traditional news survive? Should it? What is the nature of the media’s power: how fully and in what ways do the media shape public opinion, elections, debate, and policy? Are the media politically biased? How adept are political leaders at manipulating the media, and do their efforts undermine democracy? Do new communication technologies threaten the role of the traditional media? What can be learned from news coverage of the War on Terror, the war in Iraq, and the 2016 US presidential election? How does the media environment vary in different cultural contexts? Questions such as these will be addressed in this course.

AG534 Nature, Technoscience and Society

Professor: WATANABE Takehiro
********* Not offered in 2020 *******

This graduate seminar examines the cultural and political dimensions of human technology’s impact on the natural world, from the perspective of the humanities and the social sciences. Through readings in anthropology, environmental studies, and science-technology studies, we will examine the politics of scientific knowledge in the construction of nature, the role of nature ideology in the history of industrial capitalism, management of environmental and biological resources, and the ethical challenges of our technoscientific society. Seminar participation and completion of research projects are required. This class is two credits and repeatable.

AG535 Diplomatic History

Professor: MICHELIN Frank
History is an essential tool to understand the world. However, it is much more than a tool, since its study gives the temporal deepness that every leader of citizen should include in ones reflection on the world.
We will try, in this course, not to limit our study on diplomatic matters, but include every topic that will help us to understand the international relations during the 20th century, the century where occurred of the biggest cataclysms of human history. The two world wars, Russian Revolution, the Great Depression, Fascism, Cold War, Decolonization will be the main events that will punctuate this course.

AG536 The Anthropological Imagination

Professor: WATANABE Takehiro
********* Not offered in 2020 *******

This seminar will explore contemporary culture through the lens of anthropology, focusing on questions of language, exchange, and power. We will focus on classic social theory necessary for understanding contemporary anthropology, while bearing in mind social issues we face today in our globalizing world. We will complement our theoretical forays with fieldwork research assignments and readings of major ethnographies, both classic and current. Background in anthropology is preferred but not a prerequisite. Seminar participation and completion of research projects are required. This course is two credits and repeatable.

AG538 International Relations Theory

Professor: ANNO Tadashi
********* Not offered in 2020 *******

This course introduces students to international relations theory, taking the security of the Asia-Pacific region as our case study. The focus is on conventional issues of national security. The purpose of this course is twofold. One is to provide students with an advanced level introduction to theories of international relations, as they pertain to conventional security issues. The other is to introduce students to the study of security in the Asia-Pacific region.

AG541 Sovereignty, Nationhood, Liberalism

Professor: ANNO Tadashi
********* Not offered in 2020 *******

Sovereignty and nationhood have together defined the political framework of the modern world. But this framework is in tension with (at least certain strands of) liberalism, which is the dominant political, economic, and social theory of the modern era. Is liberalism compatible with sovereignty and nationhood? How should we think about the apparent disjuncture between the political framework and the theory of modern politics? What is sovereignty? What is nationhood? How should we think about the relationship between the individual and the (nation-)state? This is a seminar course which examines these issues from a theoretical viewpoint. We will read and discuss literature from political theory, international relations, sociology, and social psychology pertinent to the subject.

AG542 Topics in Global Studies

Professor: KHOR Diana
This online course focuses on a number of important issues that pertain to gender and sexuality in a global context, this course examines the connection between gender and sexuality and other factors constituting inequality, such as race, class, nationality, and so on. At the same time, since gender and sexuality are core to our identities and shape our everyday interactions, the course will inevitably touch on mechanisms of the social construction of gender and sexuality directly relevant to students' everyday life.
This is a reading- and discussion-intensive course, with background information provided in short lectures. We will be using primarily Moodle, supplemented by zoom sessions for video viewing and student-led discussions of readings. For the first class, please see Moodle for details. Should Zoom and/or Moodle fails, we will use the Bulletin Board and Report functions. As a last resort, contact me by email and we can work out an alternative, which should work for a small class like this one.

AG543 Global Issues Ⅰ

staff
********* Not offered in 2020 *******

AG544 GLOBAL ISSUES Ⅱ

Professor: WANG ChuanfeiThis course will be offered in the form of asynchronous classes. Students and instructor will interact through this course page on Moodle
Tourism is growing and is perhaps the industry employing the largest number of people around the world. This course explores the global dynamism of tourism--the networks linked by local, national, and multinational actors who create new tourism patterns, and their roles and relationships in the processes of tourism globalization. Today in many local and regional communities and countries, tourism has been used as an economic development tool. However, its globalization has also produced new issues and challenges to both in-and-outbound destinations. This course addresses a significant question--the beneficial and unequal consequences of global tourism, or what global tourism has brought to us. It focuses on some key issues, including (1) How effective is tourism in stimulating and sustaining the community's economy? (2) Can the tourism industry increase the life quality of receiving communities? (3) How much is the natural environment affected by tourism? This course will also introduce cases of Japanese tourism, focusing on how Japan addresses challenges that global tourism faces and builds sustaining tourism.

AG545 Field Practicum : Rivers I (offered in set with Rivers Ⅱ)

Professor: ITO Takeshi
This is an online seminar in environmental studies designed for social science, humanities, and science/engineering majors who wish to learn about environmental issues in contemporary Japan. By using online tools such as Moodle and Zoom, the course will examine the complex interaction between human society and the natural world.

This year, we will focus on salmon conservation.

AG546 Field Practicum : Rivers Ⅱ (offered in set with Rivers I)

Professor:  WATANABE Takehiro
This is an advanced ONLINE COURSE for students who wish to learn about environmental issues in contemporary Japan. The course will examine the complex interaction between human society and the natural world.

This year, we will focus on salmon conservation.

AG547 Prejudice and Discrimination

Professor: DEGUCHI Makiko
In this increasing globalized world, there is an assumption that our greater interconnectedness would result in greater cross-cultural awareness and understanding, and reduced conflicts. However, despite greater mobility and access to information, we continue to witness conflicts, injustice, prejudice, and discrimination. The discipline of psychology investigates both the individual mental processes as well as group behavior. This course aims to understand prejudice and discrimination using both empirical research as well as lived experiences of members of privileged groups and minority/marginalized groups. Content covered includes history of the study of prejudice and discrimination, psychological constructs and theories of stereotypes, prejudice, and discrimination, understanding of various forms of privilege and oppression, and ways of reducing prejudice and discrimination.
Class will have small group discussions, presentations, and reaction papers.