文字サイズ

学部・大学院

  1. HOME
  2. 学部・大学院
  3. 研究科・専攻案内(大学院)
  4. グローバル・スタディーズ研究科
  5. グローバル社会専攻
学部・学科案内(大学)
神学部
神学科
文学部
哲学科
史学科
国文学科
英文学科
ドイツ文学科
フランス文学科
新聞学科
保健体育研究室
総合人間科学部
教育学科
心理学科
社会学科
社会福祉学科
看護学科
法学部
法律学科
国際関係法学科
地球環境法学科
経済学部
経済学科
経営学科
外国語学部
英語学科
ドイツ語学科
フランス語学科
イスパニア語学科
ロシア語学科
ポルトガル語学科
研究コース(2014年度以降入学者対象)
専門分野制(2013年度以前入学者対象)
国際関係副専攻(2013年度以前入学者対象)
言語学副専攻(2013年度以前入学者対象)
アジア文化副専攻(2013年度以前入学者対象)
総合グローバル学部
総合グローバル学科
国際教養学部
国際教養学科
理工学部
物質生命理工学科
機能創造理工学科
情報理工学科
言語教育研究センター
グローバル教育センター
研究科・専攻案内(大学院)
神学研究科
神学専攻(博士前期課程)・組織神学専攻(博士後期課程)
文学研究科
哲学専攻
史学専攻
国文学専攻
英米文学専攻
ドイツ文学専攻
フランス文学専攻
新聞学専攻
文化交渉学専攻
実践宗教学研究科
死生学専攻
総合人間科学研究科
教育学専攻
心理学専攻
社会学専攻
社会福祉学専攻
看護学専攻
法学研究科・法科大学院
法律学専攻
法曹養成専攻(法科大学院)
経済学研究科
経済学専攻
経営学専攻
言語科学研究科
言語学専攻
グローバル・スタディーズ研究科
国際関係論専攻
地域研究専攻
グローバル社会専攻
理工学研究科
理工学専攻機械工学領域
理工学専攻電気・電子工学領域
理工学専攻応用化学領域
理工学専攻化学領域
理工学専攻数学領域
理工学専攻物理学領域
理工学専攻生物科学領域
理工学専攻情報学領域
理工学専攻グリーンサイエンス・エンジニアリング領域
地球環境学研究科
地球環境学専攻
学部・学科における教育研究上の目的及び人材養成の目的
神学部
文学部
総合人間科学部
法学部
経済学部
外国語学部
総合グローバル学部
国際教養学部
理工学部
研究科における教育研究上の目的及び人材養成の目的
学部・学科の3つのポリシー
ディプロマ・ポリシー(学位授与の方針)
神学部
文学部
総合人間科学部
法学部
経済学部
外国語学部
総合グローバル学部
国際教養学部
理工学部
カリキュラム・ポリシー(教育課程編成・実施の方針)
神学部
文学部
総合人間科学部
法学部
経済学部
外国語学部
総合グローバル学部
国際教養学部
理工学部
全学共通教育
語学科目
アドミッション・ポリシー(入学者受け入れの方針)
神学部におけるアドミッション・ポリシー
文学部におけるアドミッション・ポリシー
総合人間科学部におけるアドミッション・ポリシー
法学部におけるアドミッション・ポリシー
経済学部におけるアドミッション・ポリシー
外国語学部におけるアドミッション・ポリシー
総合グローバル学部におけるアドミッション・ポリシー
国際教養学部におけるアドミッション・ポリシー
理工学部におけるアドミッション・ポリシー
研究科・専攻の3つのポリシー
ディプロマ・ポリシー(学位授与の方針)
神学研究科
哲学研究科
文学研究科
実践宗教学研究科
総合人間科学研究科
法学研究科
経済学研究科
外国語学研究科
グローバル・スタディーズ研究科
理工学研究科
地球環境学研究科
カリキュラム・ポリシー(教育課程編成・実施の方針)
神学研究科
哲学研究科
文学研究科
実践宗教学研究科
総合人間科学研究科
法学研究科
経済学研究科
外国語学研究科
グローバル・スタディーズ研究科
理工学研究科
地球環境学研究科
アドミッション・ポリシー(入学者受け入れの方針)
神学研究科
哲学研究科
文学研究科
実践宗教学研究科
総合人間科学研究科
法学研究科
経済学研究科
言語科学研究科
グローバル・スタディーズ研究科
理工学研究科
地球環境学研究科
論文審査基準
神学研究科
哲学研究科
文学研究科
実践宗教学研究科
総合人間科学研究科
法学研究科
経済学研究科
言語科学研究科
グローバル・スタディーズ研究科
理工学研究科
地球環境学研究科

グローバル社会専攻

Exploring Critical Global-Local Issues from Tokyo

 The Graduate Program in Global Studies emphasizes inquiry into global processes in the contemporary world and their historical antecedents. Its English-taught curriculum combines the perspectives and methods of academic disciplines with cross-cultural understandings and the linguistic competencies of Japan and area studies.
  The 34 faculty members have advanced degrees from leading universities around the world and are active in research and publishing. The curriculum is supported by affiliated professors from other graduate programs in the university as well as adjunct professors. These instructors represent over a dozen nationalities, ensuring a diversity of viewpoints and experiences.
  Each semester up to 15 applicants are admitted to pursue an M.A. degree, as well as one or two Ph.D. candidates.The student body consists of international students and Japanese nationals with varied cultural backgrounds. Additionally, a few students are admitted each year as MEXT(Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports and Science Technology)research students. The small number of students encourages close student-faculty interaction.
  Five degrees are offered. The M.A. and Ph.D. in Global Studies focus on the study of global issues and processes from social science perspectives. The M.A. in International Business and Development Studies emphasizes the acquisition of analytical skills to deal with a range of contemporary global business and development problems, with a strong focus on Japan and Asia. The M.A. and Ph.D in Japanese Studies offers an integrated and interdisciplinary approach to the study of both historical and contemporary aspects of Japanese history, literature, religion, art history, society, and culture. Additionally, qualified students may pursue a dual M.A. in Japanese Studies offered by Sophia University and SOAS(School of Oriental and Asian Studies, University of London). After completing the program, students find employment in a wide range of fields inside and outside of Japan, including public and private sectors, academic institutions, and non-profit organizations.
  The master’s degree has two tracks each having different graduation requirements. Students in the thesis track write a research thesis while those in the credit track complete a graduation project. The selection of the track takes place after a student matriculates in the program. Those who seek to enter the thesis track need to apply for it, typically at the start of the second semester, with entry contingent upon academic performance, availability of a mentor for the proposed topic, and successful defense of a thesis proposal.
  The program’s small scale, and the broad experience and research interests of faculty members enable flexible course selection. In consultation with faculty members, students select a range of courses designed to meet their individual interests and to further acquisition of specialized knowledge in their chosen fields.
  While English is the language of instruction, graduate students may take advantage of the wide range of Japanese language courses offered through the undergraduate program. Graduate s tudents with a sufficient level of Japanese language proficiency as determined by a language placement examination may also take courses offered in Japanese elsewhere in the university as part of their studies.
  Students have access to the university library system, which contains more than one million volumes and 11,000 periodicals. The library has an especially rich collection of books and journals in English related to the study of Japan. Digital resources include extensive databases, e-journals, and search engines for journal and newspaper articles. Holdings from other universities can be obtained through inter-library loan, while the university’s location in central Tokyo provides easy access to the National Diet Library and other external facilities.
  The program also draws on the resources of the Institute of Comparative Culture. The Institute’s lecture series features leading scholars in Japan studies, and prominent international figures, such as Nobel Prize winners and heads of international organizations. It also sponsors research projects and seminars, such as “Globalization, Food, and Social Identities in the Pacific Region” and “Teaching Tokyo.” These activities are an opportunity
for graduate students and faculty members to come together in fruitful exchanges.
  The program has its own computer facilities and provides students with on-campus lockers and space for storing materials. Graduate students can also use the university computing facilities, cafeterias, athletic facilities, and medical and counseling centers. As with urban universities generally in Japan, most students live off-campus.

Selected thesis topics of students

◎ Global Studies
■ Globalization and local land governance : Mechanisms of confiscation and contentious politics in Myanmar’s Dawei Special
■ Efforts to Promote a Multicultural Church : The Case of Filipinos in Tokyo’s Multilingual Churches
■ A Study of Japanese University LGBT Student Groups: LGBT Youth, Peer Support, and Activism
■ Japanese Family as an Ideological Micro State Apparatus
■ Intimate Citizenship and LGBT Rights : The Experience of Foreigners in Japan
■ America’s Far East Jewel : The Occupation and Reimagining of Japan

◎International Business and Development Studies
■ Testing the Challenges of International Entrepreneurship in Japan
■ Assessing the Performance of Islamic and Non-Islamic Microfinance Institutions to Combat Income Poverty and the Culture of Poverty : A Case Study in Yogyakarta, Indonesia
■ Human Development and Governance in Transition Countries : An Empirical Analysis
■ Employees Turnover Intentions in Thai Manufacturing Companies

◎Japanese Studies
■ From Point of Tangency: Lee Ufan’s Field of Perception and Encounter
■ The F ilipino S tudents’ N arratives o f J apan 3 .11 : Networks, Risk Perception and Response(A Study on Foreign Students’ Behavioral Responses during Disasters)
■ Koebi-tai behind Setouchi Triennale : A Critical Evaluation of Their Volunteer Activities
■ Rediscovering Usurai : Kitada Usurai and the Kannen Shosetsu Movement in Meiji Women’s Literature
■ Painting the Town Red : Anticipating Modernism in Natsume Soseki’s And Then
■ A Chinese Interpreter in Bakumatsu Japan : Luo Sen, Perry Mission and Information on the Taiping Rebellion
■ A Gift (or Omen?) Along the Shoreline of Our Existence : Aya Takano’s Artistic Transformation Following 3 .11

>>グローバル社会専攻オリジナルサイトはこちら http://gpgs.fla.sophia.ac.jp/

戻る

ページトップへ