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Academic Information

Course
The East Asian Studies program will be offered in both Summer Session 1 and Summer Session 2 from 2018. 
The courses we offer in the Session 1 are different from the ones in the Session 2. (Some courses are offered in both sessions.)

Class size
About 20-30 students.(the number of the class may vary depending on the number of participants )

The courses we offer and instructors' profiles
Summer Session 1 (June 4-June 29, 2018)
Lecturers’ Profiles
1.Prof. John WEST(Japanese Business and Economy)
2.Prof. Roger PURDY(Japanese History: Edo and Tokyo A)
3.Prof. HUANG and other professors
(Global Sustainability Outlook and Practice in Japan
4.Prof. Helene ALT(Japanese Art A: Prof. Helene ALT )
5.Prof. Dan O’NEILL(East Asian Cinema)

Summer Session 1 (June 4-June 29, 2018)
Course Descriptions & Overviews
1.Japanese Business and Economy: Prof. John WEST
This course will provide students with an overview of the development of the Japanese business world and economy, and an analysis of the Japan’s challenges and opportunities in the “Asian Century”.
Syllabus

2.Japanese History: Edo and Tokyo A: Prof. Roger PURDY
Japanese History: Edo & Tokyo “A” introduces students to major themes in pre-modern and early modern Japanese history. Special attention will be given to Japan since 1600, when much of the social and political development took place in Edo, present day Tokyo.
Syllabus

3.Global Sustainability Outlook and Practice in Japan: Prof. HUANG and other professors
This is an introductory but transdisciplinary course that focuses on various environmental issues from global and reginal water resources, urban flooding, aquatic ecosystem degradation, climate change policy, forest policy, waste management, environmental business, environmental sociology to environmental law.
Syllabus

4.Japanese Art A: Prof. Helene ALT
The course covers the history of Japanese art from the Jômon (early Neolithic) to the end of the Late Heian period (12th century) in chronological order. The emphasis is on sculpture and painting, but other types of decorative arts such as ceramics and lacquer ware are introduced where necessary.
Syllabus

5.East Asian Cinema: Prof. Dan O’NEILL
We will look at some of the great works of contemporary East Asian cinema, featuring films that explore love, family and friendship through the manifold alignments of class,gender and sexuality.
Syllabus

The Courses we offer and Instructors' profiles
Summer Session 2 (July 2-July 27, 2018)
Lecturers’ Profiles
1.Prof. John WEST(Development Issues: Asia and the World)
2.Prof. Roger PURDY'Japanese History: Edo and Tokyo B)
3.Prof. Mark OSHIMA (Japanese Theater)
4.Prof. Helene ALT(Japanese Art B)
5.Prof. William FEENEY(Japanese Pop Culture)
6.Prof. Yuxin PEI(Contemporary Chinese Society )
7.Prof. Alisa FREEDMAN(Japanese Literature and the City)
8.Prof. Haruko WAKABAYASHI(Topics in Japanese History)
9.Prof. Gary EBERSOLE(Survey of Japanese Religions )

Course Descriptions & Overviews
Summer Session 2 (July 2-July 27, 2018)
1.Development Issues: Asia and the World: Prof. John WEST
This course will explore issues related to the promise of an Asian Century, challenges for realising an Asian Century and how Asia's renaissance is changing relationships between Asian countries, as well as the region's relationship with the rest of the world.
Syllabus

2.Japanese History: Edo and Tokyo B: Prof. Roger PURDY
Japanese History: Edo & Tokyo “A” introduces students to major themes in early modern and modern Japanese history. Special attention will be given to the changes that occurred in Edo and Tokyo since the arrival of the West in the mid-19th century.
Syllabus

3.Japanese Theater: Prof. Mark OSHIMA
Although it gives the impression of continuity, Japanese culture is the product of successive waves of change and consolidation. The three most important times in this regard are the Muromachi period, the Edo period and the Meiji Restoration. This course will concentrate on the culture of the Muromachi period and its theatrical forms of noh and the comic kyogen theater and the culture of the Edo period and its theatrical forms of kabuki and Bunraku puppet theater.
Syllabus

4.Japanese Art B: Prof. Helene ALT
The course covers the history of Japanese art from the Kamakura period (13th century) to the end of the Edo period (mid-19th century) in chronological order. The emphasis is on sculpture and painting, but other types of decorative arts such as ceramics and lacquer ware are introduced where necessary.
Syllabus

5.Japanese Pop Culture: Prof. William FEENEY
This course explores contemporary Japanese popular culture from an anthropological perspective. To approach these questions we will we want to understand how emblematic media forms such as anime, television programs, idols, anime, etc… constitute and participate in some particular ‘culture’ in distinctive ways, and how these cultures relate to existing socio-historical conditions and aesthetic traditions.
Syllabus

6.Contemporary Chinese Society: Prof. Yuxin PEI
This class presents an overview of contemporary Chinese life in reform-era China (1978-present). We will examine many aspects of Chinese society such as “migration”, “urbanization”, “media and popular culture”, “family and reproduction”, “marriage” , “Gender and sexuality”, “feminism”, “civil society and social work”, etc, with a particular emphasis on the global angle: the impact of “globalization” on China and China’s impact on the rest of the world.
Syllabus

7.Japanese Literature and the City: Prof. Alisa FREEDMAN
In this survey course, we will read a variety of Japanese literary works about Tokyo written between the nineteenth and twenty-first centuries by both canonized and so-called “popular” authors. The class will consider the different ways Japanese writers chose to describe the growth of Tokyo, social and technological changes, relationships among genders, new entertainments, trauma of poverty and war, youth culture, and the loneliness sometimes felt in the crowded city.
Syllabus

8.Topics in Japanese History: Prof. Haruko WAKABAYASHI
This course introduces students to some of the major themes in medieval and early modern Japanese history, with a primary focus on its samurai tradition, through the reading of Chūshingura (commonly known in the Western world as the “Tale of the 47 Samurai”) and other war tales and primary sources (in translation).
Syllabus

9.Survey of Japanese Religions: Prof. Gary EBERSOLE
This course is a survey of the history of religions in the Japanese islands from the pre-historical period to the present. In this course, religion will be studied as a social and historical phenomenon.
Syllabus

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